Difference: Wireless (3 vs. 4)

Revision 42011-09-27 - WilliamSeligman

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META TOPICPARENT name="Computing"

Wireless routers

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NETGEAR-research research building, main hallway
NETGEAR-student research building, north corridor
NETGEAR-elec electronics building, lower floor
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mansion-relay Mansion house, first-floor lunchroom
mansion-wireless Mansion house, first-floor sitting room
  The NETGEAR networks come in two flavors: running at 2.4 GHz, with a maximum throughput of 130 Mb/s, and 5 GHz, with a maximum throughput of 300 Mb/s; the latter flavor has "-5G" appended to the network name. However, as of May-2010, the routers are connected to 100 Mb/s network switches, which means you won't see the maximum wireless speed. For now, the choice between the flavors is largely arbitrary; however, the 2.4G signal strength will probably be greater.
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Wired versus wireless

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As noted in the discussion of the Nevis particle-physics networks, the wired connections in most Nevis offices connect to the private network, while the wireless connections are via the sandbox network.
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As noted in the discussion of the Nevis particle-physics networks, the wired connections in most Nevis offices connect to the private network, while the wireless connections connect via the sandbox network.
  The practical differences between using the two networks:
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    • You can't browse for printers using CUPS
    • Machines on the private network are invisible to the wireless sandbox network.
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Mansion house

The wireless network in the mansion house connects to the network in the research building via a wireless bridge. The maximum speed of this bridge is 54 megabits per second (802.11g). It can be slower if there are obstacles between the buildings; e.g., rain, snow, tree branches blown by the wind. Given the bandwidth limitation, please be considerate of other users in the mansion house if you need to download large files or stream video.

 

Network details

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Each wireless router has its own IP address, and each is its own separate DHCP server. They have been configured so that if a wireless router has the address 10.43.2.N, the DHCP addresses it offers are in the range 192.168.N.XXX, where XXX is from 2 to 100.

The purpose of this arrangement is to make it easier to find out which wireless router your laptop is using. For example, if your laptop has been assigned the IP address 192.168.5.4, then it's getting its wireless signal from the router at 10.43.2.5 = wireless-library.nevis.columbia.edu, the wireless access point in the Nevis library.

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Each wireless router has its own IP address, and each is its own separate DHCP server. They have been configured so that if a wireless router has the address 10.43.2.N, the DHCP addresses it offers are in the range 192.168.N.XXX, where XXX is from 2 to 100.

The purpose of this arrangement is to make it easier to find out which wireless router your laptop is using. For example, if your laptop has been assigned the IP address 192.168.5.4, then it's getting its wireless signal from the router at 10.43.2.5 = wireless-library.nevis.columbia.edu, the wireless access point in the Nevis library.

 
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