Difference: Mail-relatedFiles (1 vs. 18)

Revision 182019-09-30 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 30 to 30
 

/a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc

Changed:
<
<
Procmail is a program that delivers your mail to your INBOX. You can create a file /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc file to filter messages, automatically direct mail into certain folders, and other advanced operations.

There are two places where you can put a procmail command file: /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc. The latter name is the standard location for a procmail file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.

Many mail readers (such as Thunderbird) have similar facilities. The advantages of using procmail are:

  • Procmail offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, most mail readers cannot send an e-mail in response to a particular message you receive; procmail can.

  • Procmail runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as it receives it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you read mail using more than one computer or more than one mail-reading program, you might want to put your mail filtering in procmail instead of duplicating that functionality on different machines and programs.

The disadvantage is, of course, complexity; procmail uses its own command language.

If you're interested in exploring procmail, I recommend the following resources:

If you have both files /a/mail/procmailrc/$user and ~/.procmail, the commands in both will be executed. Be careful! This is not the behavior of the forwarding files described above!

>
>
See the Procmail page for details.
 

~/.spamassassin/user_prefs

Revision 172019-09-12 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 54 to 54
 

~/.spamassassin/user_prefs

Changed:
<
<
For the most part, you can ignore the contents of your ~/.spamassassin/ directory, which is automatically created for you the first time you receive mail at Nevis. The one file that you might want to look at is ~/.spamassassin/user_prefs, which allows you to control the functionality of SpamAssassin.
>
>
For the most part, you can ignore the contents of your ~/.spamassassin/ directory, which is automatically created for you the first time you receive mail at Nevis. The one file that you might want to look at is ~/.spamassassin/user_prefs, which allows you to control the functionality of SpamAssassin.
 
Deleted:
<
<
Your mail reader may also offer spam-filtering options. The advantages of SpamAssassin are similar to those of using procmail:

  • SpamAssassin offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, you can control the exact weighting assigned to each one of the tests that SpamAssassin performs.

  • SpamAssassin runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as it receives it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you blacklist an address in ~/.spamassassin/user_prefs, it will be bounced by the mail server and never get into your INBOX.

If you're interested in configuring SpamAssassin, I recommend the following resources:

 \ No newline at end of file
Added:
>
>
Your mail reader may also offer spam-filtering options. See this page on configuring SpamAssassin for why this is not the best option.
 \ No newline at end of file

Revision 162016-10-04 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 68 to 68
 
Deleted:
<
<

Files on the mail server

The following files are included on this page to be complete. Since they're located on the mail server, and users don't have login access to the mail server, you won't be able to inspect these files unless you're a systems administrator.

/etc/mail/

This directory contains the configuration files for the sendmail program, which handles the SMTP services on the mail server. The main sendmail configuration file is /etc/mail/sendmail.mc.

The file /etc/mail/mimedefang-filter controls MIMEDefang, which strips suspicious attachments from mail messages.

/etc/dovecot.conf

The configuration file for dovecot, the program that handles IMAP and POP3 services on the mail server.

/etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter

A milter is a "mail filter." SpamAssassin (and MIMEDefang) are implemented on our mail server as filters, which means they can bounce messages before they have been fully received. (Among other benefits, this means that we're never responsible for sending back spam- or virus-laden messages; it's the mail server that sent the message that has to do it.) The file /etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter controls the operation of spamass-milter, the milter program that calls SpamAssassin for each message as it's received.

/var/indexes/$user/

IMAP maintains an index of the headers of each message in your mail folders, so it doesn't have to re-read the entire folder every time you click on it in your mail reader. The indexes are kept in /var/indexes/$user/.

 \ No newline at end of file

Revision 152011-11-02 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 81 to 81
 

/etc/dovecot.conf

Changed:
<
<
The configuration file for dovecot, the program that handles IMAP and POP3 services on the mail server.
>
>
The configuration file for dovecot, the program that handles IMAP and POP3 services on the mail server.
 

/etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter

Revision 142011-09-08 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 22 to 22
 

/a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward

Changed:
<
<
The forwarding file controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.
>
>
The forwarding file controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.
  There are two places where you can put your forwarding instructions: /a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward. The latter name is the standard location for a forwarding file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.

Revision 132010-05-21 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 10 to 10
 

/a/mail/inbox/$user

Changed:
<
<
This is the file that contains the contents of your INBOX. On the mail server, it's located in /mail/inbox/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
>
>
This is the file that contains the contents of your INBOX. On the mail server, it's located in /mail/inbox/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
 

/a/mail/folders/$user

Changed:
<
<
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files. On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
>
>
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files. On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
 

/a/mail/folders/$user/.subscriptions

Revision 122010-04-05 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 14 to 14
 

/a/mail/folders/$user

Changed:
<
<
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch on 18-Feb-09). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
>
>
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files. On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
 

/a/mail/folders/$user/.subscriptions

Revision 112010-03-18 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

The default mail setup at Nevis works for most users. However, if you'd like finer control over your e-mail, mail notifications, mail forwarding, spam processing, mail filtering, or are trying to fix a mail problem, the following information can be useful.

Changed:
<
<
In the descriptions below, $user is the name of your Nevis Linux cluster login account.
>
>
In the descriptions below, $user is the name of your Nevis Linux cluster login account.
 

Revision 102010-03-16 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 36 to 36
  Many mail readers (such as Thunderbird) have similar facilities. The advantages of using procmail are:
Changed:
<
<
  • Procmail offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, most mail readers cannot send out e-mail in response to a particular message you receive; procmail can.
>
>
  • Procmail offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, most mail readers cannot send an e-mail in response to a particular message you receive; procmail can.
 
  • Procmail runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as it receives it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you read mail using more than one computer or more than one mail-reading program, you might want to put your mail filtering in procmail instead of duplicating that functionality on different machines and programs.

Revision 92010-02-23 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 22 to 22
 

/a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward

Changed:
<
<
The forwarding file controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.
>
>
The forwarding file controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.
 
Changed:
<
<
There are two places where you can put your forwarding instructions: /a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward. The latter name is the standard location for a forwarding file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.
>
>
There are two places where you can put your forwarding instructions: /a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward. The latter name is the standard location for a forwarding file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.
  If you have both files /a/mail/forward/$user and ~/.forward, only the lines in the former will be interpreted. The latter will be ignored.
Line: 32 to 32
  Procmail is a program that delivers your mail to your INBOX. You can create a file /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc file to filter messages, automatically direct mail into certain folders, and other advanced operations.
Changed:
<
<
There are two places where you can put a procmail command file: /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc. The latter name is the standard location for a procmail file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.
>
>
There are two places where you can put a procmail command file: /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc. The latter name is the standard location for a procmail file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.
  Many mail readers (such as Thunderbird) have similar facilities. The advantages of using procmail are:

Revision 82010-02-23 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"
Changed:
<
<

Files that affect your mail

>
>

Files that affect your mail

  The default mail setup at Nevis works for most users. However, if you'd like finer control over your e-mail, mail notifications, mail forwarding, spam processing, mail filtering, or are trying to fix a mail problem, the following information can be useful.
Line: 77 to 77
  This directory contains the configuration files for the sendmail program, which handles the SMTP services on the mail server. The main sendmail configuration file is /etc/mail/sendmail.mc.
Changed:
<
<
The file /etc/mail/mimedefang-filter controls MIMEDefang, which strips suspicious attachments from mail messages.
>
>
The file /etc/mail/mimedefang-filter controls MIMEDefang, which strips suspicious attachments from mail messages.
 

/etc/dovecot.conf

Line: 85 to 85
 

/etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter

Changed:
<
<
A milter is a "mail filter." SpamAssassin (and MIMEDefang) are implemented on our mail server as filters, which means they can bounce messages before they have been fully received. (Among other benefits, this means that we're never responsible for sending back spam- or virus-laden messages; it's the mail server that sent the message that has to do it.) The file /etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter controls the operation of spamass-milter, the milter program that calls SpamAssassin for each message as it's received.
>
>
A milter is a "mail filter." SpamAssassin (and MIMEDefang) are implemented on our mail server as filters, which means they can bounce messages before they have been fully received. (Among other benefits, this means that we're never responsible for sending back spam- or virus-laden messages; it's the mail server that sent the message that has to do it.) The file /etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter controls the operation of spamass-milter, the milter program that calls SpamAssassin for each message as it's received.
 

/var/indexes/$user/

IMAP maintains an index of the headers of each message in your mail folders, so it doesn't have to re-read the entire folder every time you click on it in your mail reader. The indexes are kept in /var/indexes/$user/.

Deleted:
<
<

-- WilliamSeligman - 24 Dec 2008

 \ No newline at end of file

Revision 72009-02-18 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 16 to 16
  This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch on 18-Feb-09). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
Added:
>
>

/a/mail/folders/$user/.subscriptions

This file contains the list of IMAP folders that you see in your mail reader. For the most part, you don't have to change the contents of this file; you can drag, drop, create, (un)subscribe, etc., using your mail program. But every once in a while, it's easier to edit this text file than it is to manually click on lots of different folders.

 

/a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward

The forwarding file controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.

Revision 62009-02-06 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 14 to 14
 

/a/mail/folders/$user

Changed:
<
<
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
>
>
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch on 18-Feb-09). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
 

/a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward

Line: 67 to 67
 

Files on the mail server

Changed:
<
<
The following files are included on this web to be complete. Since they're located on the mail server, and users don't have login access to the mail server, you won't be able to inspect these files directly, unless you're a systems administrator.
>
>
The following files are included on this page to be complete. Since they're located on the mail server, and users don't have login access to the mail server, you won't be able to inspect these files unless you're a systems administrator.
 

/etc/mail/

Revision 52009-01-12 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 16 to 16
  This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
Changed:
<
<

~/.forward

>
>

/a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward

 
Changed:
<
<
The .forward file in your home directory controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.
>
>
The forwarding file controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.
 
Changed:
<
<

~/.procmailrc

>
>
There are two places where you can put your forwarding instructions: /a/mail/forward/$user or ~/.forward. The latter name is the standard location for a forwarding file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.
 
Changed:
<
<
Procmail is a program that delivers your mail to your INBOX. You can create a .procmailrc file in your home directory to filter messages, automatically direct mail into certain folders, and other advanced operations.
>
>
If you have both files /a/mail/forward/$user and ~/.forward, only the lines in the former will be interpreted. The latter will be ignored.

/a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc

Procmail is a program that delivers your mail to your INBOX. You can create a file /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc file to filter messages, automatically direct mail into certain folders, and other advanced operations.

There are two places where you can put a procmail command file: /a/mail/procmailrc/$user or ~/.procmailrc. The latter name is the standard location for a procmail file, and it's supported at Nevis. The former location is preferred, however, since the file will remain available to the mail server if your home directory becomes unavailable; e.g., if your group's server goes down.

  Many mail readers (such as Thunderbird) have similar facilities. The advantages of using procmail are:
Line: 32 to 38
  The disadvantage is, of course, complexity; procmail uses its own command language.
Changed:
<
<
If you're interesting in exploring procmail, I recommend the following resources:
>
>
If you're interested in exploring procmail, I recommend the following resources:
 
Changed:
<
<
>
>

If you have both files /a/mail/procmailrc/$user and ~/.procmail, the commands in both will be executed. Be careful! This is not the behavior of the forwarding files described above!

 

~/.spamassassin/user_prefs

Line: 59 to 67
 

Files on the mail server

Changed:
<
<
The following files are included to be complete. Since they're located on the mail server, and users don't have login access to the mail server, you won't be able to inspect these files directly, unless you're a systems administrator.
>
>
The following files are included on this web to be complete. Since they're located on the mail server, and users don't have login access to the mail server, you won't be able to inspect these files directly, unless you're a systems administrator.
 

/etc/mail/

Revision 42008-12-28 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 73 to 73
 

/etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter

Changed:
<
<
A milter is a "mail filter." SpamAssassin (and http://www.nevis.columbia.edu/mail/antivirus.html) are implemented on our mail server as filters, which means they can bounce messages before they have been fully received. (Among other benefits, this means that we're never responsible for sending back spam- or virus-laden messages; it's the mail server that sent the message that has to do it.) The file /etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter controls the operation of spamass-milter, the milter program that calls SpamAssassin for each message as it's received.
>
>
A milter is a "mail filter." SpamAssassin (and MIMEDefang) are implemented on our mail server as filters, which means they can bounce messages before they have been fully received. (Among other benefits, this means that we're never responsible for sending back spam- or virus-laden messages; it's the mail server that sent the message that has to do it.) The file /etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter controls the operation of spamass-milter, the milter program that calls SpamAssassin for each message as it's received.
 

/var/indexes/$user/

Revision 32008-12-24 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 14 to 14
 

/a/mail/folders/$user

Changed:
<
<
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
>
>
This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.
 

~/.forward

Revision 22008-12-24 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

Line: 28 to 28
 
  • Procmail offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, most mail readers cannot send out e-mail in response to a particular message you receive; procmail can.
Changed:
<
<
  • Procmail runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as you receive it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you read mail using more than one computer or more than one mail-reading program, you might want to put your mail filtering in procmail instead of duplicating that functionality on different machines and programs.
>
>
  • Procmail runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as it receives it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you read mail using more than one computer or more than one mail-reading program, you might want to put your mail filtering in procmail instead of duplicating that functionality on different machines and programs.
  The disadvantage is, of course, complexity; procmail uses its own command language.

If you're interesting in exploring procmail, I recommend the following resources:

Added:
>
>
 
Added:
>
>

~/.spamassassin/user_prefs

For the most part, you can ignore the contents of your ~/.spamassassin/ directory, which is automatically created for you the first time you receive mail at Nevis. The one file that you might want to look at is ~/.spamassassin/user_prefs, which allows you to control the functionality of SpamAssassin.

Your mail reader may also offer spam-filtering options. The advantages of SpamAssassin are similar to those of using procmail:

  • SpamAssassin offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, you can control the exact weighting assigned to each one of the tests that SpamAssassin performs.

  • SpamAssassin runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as it receives it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you blacklist an address in ~/.spamassassin/user_prefs, it will be bounced by the mail server and never get into your INBOX.

If you're interested in configuring SpamAssassin, I recommend the following resources:

Files on the mail server

The following files are included to be complete. Since they're located on the mail server, and users don't have login access to the mail server, you won't be able to inspect these files directly, unless you're a systems administrator.

/etc/mail/

This directory contains the configuration files for the sendmail program, which handles the SMTP services on the mail server. The main sendmail configuration file is /etc/mail/sendmail.mc.

The file /etc/mail/mimedefang-filter controls MIMEDefang, which strips suspicious attachments from mail messages.

/etc/dovecot.conf

The configuration file for dovecot, the program that handles IMAP and POP3 services on the mail server.

/etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter

A milter is a "mail filter." SpamAssassin (and http://www.nevis.columbia.edu/mail/antivirus.html) are implemented on our mail server as filters, which means they can bounce messages before they have been fully received. (Among other benefits, this means that we're never responsible for sending back spam- or virus-laden messages; it's the mail server that sent the message that has to do it.) The file /etc/sysconfig/spamass-milter controls the operation of spamass-milter, the milter program that calls SpamAssassin for each message as it's received.

/var/indexes/$user/

IMAP maintains an index of the headers of each message in your mail folders, so it doesn't have to re-read the entire folder every time you click on it in your mail reader. The indexes are kept in /var/indexes/$user/.

  -- WilliamSeligman - 24 Dec 2008

Revision 12008-12-24 - WilliamSeligman

Line: 1 to 1
Added:
>
>
META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Files that affect your mail

The default mail setup at Nevis works for most users. However, if you'd like finer control over your e-mail, mail notifications, mail forwarding, spam processing, mail filtering, or are trying to fix a mail problem, the following information can be useful.

In the descriptions below, $user is the name of your Nevis Linux cluster login account.

/a/mail/inbox/$user

This is the file that contains the contents of your INBOX. On the mail server, it's located in /mail/inbox/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.

/a/mail/folders/$user

This is the default location of your IMAP mail files (after we've made the IMAP file switch). On the mail server, this path is /mail/folders/$user, but the above path makes the file visible on other the other systems on the cluster via automount.

~/.forward

The .forward file in your home directory controls how your e-mail is forwarded, and can also be used to automatically send vacation messages.

~/.procmailrc

Procmail is a program that delivers your mail to your INBOX. You can create a .procmailrc file in your home directory to filter messages, automatically direct mail into certain folders, and other advanced operations.

Many mail readers (such as Thunderbird) have similar facilities. The advantages of using procmail are:

  • Procmail offers more flexibility than most mail readers. For example, most mail readers cannot send out e-mail in response to a particular message you receive; procmail can.

  • Procmail runs on the mail server, which means it operates on your e-mail as you receive it. A mail reader can only process your messages as it reads them off the server. In particular, if you read mail using more than one computer or more than one mail-reading program, you might want to put your mail filtering in procmail instead of duplicating that functionality on different machines and programs.

The disadvantage is, of course, complexity; procmail uses its own command language.

If you're interesting in exploring procmail, I recommend the following resources:

-- WilliamSeligman - 24 Dec 2008

 
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