Difference: Certificates (4 vs. 5)

Revision 52013-11-26 - WilliamSeligman

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META TOPICPARENT name="Mail"

Nevis Certificates

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  The Nevis mail and web servers use certificates to enhance security. Not all mail readers and browsers handle certificates in the same way. This web page reviews how to work with certificates in some common programs.
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Thunderbird, Firefox, and Sunbird

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Thunderbird and Firefox

  When you first access the Nevis server, you'll be presented with a dialog box saying that the program does not recognize the certificate's authority, and will ask for your approval. As long as the certificate says it was issued by Nevis, just check on the option that says to accept the certificate forever. On subsequent dialog boxes, continue to select the option that says you approve the certificate.
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  • Identification. A certificate can be used to verify that a remote computer does in fact belong to the company that it says it does.
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At Nevis, the value of the second point is marginal. A company that deals with financial transactions over the web might arrange to have their certificate "signed" by a central well-known authority (such as Verisign). The Nevis certificates have no such verification, since these signatures cost money.
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At Nevis, the value of the second point is marginal. A company that deals with financial transactions over the web might arrange to have their certificate "signed" by a central well-known authority (such as Verisign). The Nevis certificates have no such verification, since these signatures cost money.
 
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Most modern mail readers (including Alpine, Thunderbird, and Outlook) can handle SSL encryption, and hence can handle certificates when the program is properly configured. They will automatically approve certificates that have been signed by a certificate authority they recognize.

For the most common mail readers used at Nevis, here's how to deal with certificates whose authority is not recognized by the program. Other programs (such as calendar software) typically handle certificates in the same way.

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Most modern mail readers (including Alpine, Thunderbird, and Outlook) can handle SSL encryption, and hence can handle certificates when the program is properly configured. They will automatically approve certificates that have been signed by a certificate authority they recognize.
 
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